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    Didi Chuxing, a ride-hailing behemoth in China, reveals I.P.O. papers.

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    Didi Chuxing, the Chinese ride-hailing company, made its initial public offering filing public on Thursday, as ride-hailing services begin reviving with the receding of the pandemic.

    Founded in Beijing in 2012, Didi began as a taxi-hailing service before expanding into other forms of transportation. In 2015, it merged with another Chinese rival, Kuaidi Dache, to form what became Didi Chuxing.

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    Didi has since been dominant in China. In 2016, Uber, which had been spending heavily to grow in China, sold its Chinese operations to Didi. (Uber was granted a stake in the resulting company.) Didi now operates in 15 countries, including Brazil and Mexico.

    The company’s I.P.O. is likely to be closely scrutinized amid a wave of other technology offerings and as Beijing has begun to rein in domestic tech giants. Didi was valued at $56 billion in 2017 and its investors include SoftBank of Japan and Mubadala, an Abu Dhabi state fund.

    Didi’s filing, made under its formal name, Xiaoju Kuaizhi, showed that revenues declined 8 percent to $21.63 billion last year as passenger numbers slid during the pandemic. The company lost $1.6 billion last year, though it reported a profit of $30 million in the first quarter of this year. Like most ride-hailing companies, Didi has historically been unprofitable.

    Didi said that an I.P.O. would fund an expansion.

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    “We aspire to become a truly global technology company,” Didi’s founders, Cheng Wei and Jean Liu, wrote in a letter included with the filing. “What we have learned and built is relevant across the globe — in Latin America, Russia, South Africa or anywhere where affordable, safe and convenient mobility is valuable.”

    Other ride-hailing services have reported that business has been recovering. Last month, Uber said revenue for the first three months of the year — excluding the costs of a settlement — was up 8 percent from a year ago, to $3.5 billion. The company lost $108 million.

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